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Is This the Source of the Problem?

 

I really think Jim Geraghty of National Review has an accurate description of what we are up against as Conservatives attempt to deal with the Leftists’ current behavior. We are trying with civilized political means and discussion to deal with what is at its roots a psychological problem.

To quote from Jim’s column:

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Disturbing Facts That Will Change Your Mind About Brett Kavanaugh

 

Many conservatives on Ricochet are no doubt pro-Kavanaugh. But these facts will change your mind about him.

1) Conservatives claim that Kavanaugh’s accusers’ charges may be influenced by his judicial beliefs, and the accusers may have false or implanted memories. If all of these are true, then imagine the disturbing consequences: his judicial opinions could be enough to plant memories of rape within the minds of women.

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America Ranks as a Top 10 Nation for Economic Freedom. But There’s a Twist…

 
Economic Freedom of the World: 2018 Annual Report from the Fraser Institute.

To the extent “Make America Great Again” is an economic argument, it’s one that doesn’t make much sense. During the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump described America as pretty much a failed state, even using the phrase “third world country” multiple times. As he told The Washington Post, “I think we were a very powerful, very wealthy country. And we’re a poor country now.” This dystopian view was also part of the claim that 2016 was the “Flight 93” election where the nationalist 99% had one final chance to “charge the cockpit” and seize control from globalist Davoisie oligarchy running Washington and ruining America.

Of course, exploiting economic discontent is what so-called populists do, whether they are of the left or right. And they aren’t going to let facts — such as America having a net worth of over $100 trillion — get in their way. Yet it’s worth making sure those facts stay front and center as much as possible. Helpful in this endeavor is the new “Economic Freedom of the World” report from the Fraser Institute, which “measures the degree to which the policies and institutions of countries are supportive of economic freedom.” And some good news: America is back in the top ten. The US economy scores particularly high in areas such as “sound money” and “regulation.”

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Jill Lepore’s Slanted Truths

 
President Herbert Hoover.

Few books have received as much instantaneous acclaim as Harvard historian Jill Lepore’s These Truths: A History of the United States. Her aim is to distill in 932 densely packed pages the history of an entire nation. The title of the book is an explicit echo of Thomas Jefferson’s famous words in the Declaration of Independence. But if Jefferson was a small government thinker, Lepore is not. The book covers many cultural and social issues—as well as constitutional and regulatory matters, on which she takes a strong and uncritical progressive stance that sees government intervention as an essential tool to correct the imbalances of the market.

In developing this idea, Lepore’s book covers multiple topics with stunning rapidity, elegant compression, and apparent erudition. One constant theme traces the interaction between constitutional law and technological development from the Founding period to the present, covering everything from the printing press to the Internet. But even that subject is too extensive to receive a full account, so on this occasion I will confine my attention to a small portion of that topic, covering the years between 1920 and 1945 dealing with the rise of broadcasting by radio and the government’s attempt to regulate the airwaves. This case study offers a contrast between the classical liberal view of limited government with strong property and contract rights that I have long defended, and Lepore’s clear endorsement of the progressive tradition that has in many ways displaced it.

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It’s Getting Violent…

 

So Ted Cruz and his wife got chased out of a restaurant, adding to the list of victims of Democrats who are growing increasingly confrontational and violent. I think this is just the beginning, and soon 1968 may look like 1955. Anyway, someone named J.R. Salzman posted a simply wonderful tweet: “Democrats haven’t chased this many people out of restaurants since the civil rights era.”

I hope you get as much joy out of that as I did. Man, that’s funny. But what’s going on is not funny. It’s absolutely incredible that Democrats call Republicans fascists. Absolutely incredible. Again, I think this is going to get a lot worse before it gets better. I hope I’m wrong.

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A Prediction

 

Any Republican Senator who fails to vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh will forever destroy his chance to be a presidential contender, like Rick Santorum did when he supported the soon-to-be Democrat Arlen Spector over Pat Toomey.

I’m looking at you, Ben Sasse. Jeff Flake has already burned that bridge.

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An Interesting Poll

 

The midterms are coming and there have been lots of discussions of polling. Generic Congressional ballots, individual races, and Nate Silver’s model all create discussion. I came across an interesting poll.

According to Gallup, the Republican party has its highest approval rating since 2011. This is only the second time in the last decade that the Republicans scored better than the Democrats.

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George Gilder: Forget Cloud Computing, Blockchain is the Future

 

Is blockchain the technology of the future? George Gilder, author of Life After Google, argues that bitcoin and blockchain technology is revolutionizing the Internet. I sit down with George to discuss technology, cloud computing, big data, and the growing role of blockchain in innovating new technologies.

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Flood Damage

 

View original artwork here.

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Where’s Your Hill?

 

When Roy Moore was in the process of being brought down in the Alabama Senate race last December, the standard response from the establishment side of the GOP was, “Look, Moore is a nutcase. This is not a court of law. There is no due process or presumption of innocence. He’s not the hill you want to die on.”

When Alex Jones was purged off of social media the response was, “This is not a government action, but the actions of private individuals. Besides, he’s a nutcase and this is not the hill you want to die on.”

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Reality Check: Adolescent Males

 

When the Kavanaugh story broke I made the comment that, whether or not the account is believable, it isn’t a sufficiently big deal to warrant preventing his confirmation. Since then I’ve read and heard several comments, including in conservative media, to the effect that these are “serious allegations” that, if true, would certainly disqualify Kavanaugh.

I disagree. I think we are witnessing a preening, unrealistic outrage rooted in a fantasy of how humans are supposed to behave. Life isn’t a fairy tale, never less so than when it involves intoxicated, scantily clad teens cavorting without adult supervision.

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Slow Down, Already!

 

We were all going at least 80 when I saw the couch tumble off the back of the pickup and roll down the fast lane. The car in front of me (the only one between my SUV and the couch) couldn’t dodge it. The eruption of wood, stuffing, and fabric was something else. The truck didn’t even slow down.

Already moving into the emergency lane to avoid the remnants, I slowed as the hit car limped over just in front of me. The poor driver was a young man of about 30. He was obviously in shock, with abrasions on his arm from the exploding air bag. His phone was somewhere in the back seat so I called 911.

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Moonstruck and the Greater Good

 

Seems many a story here on Ricochet revolve around travel and doing my fair share of traveling I am compelled to share. I was on my way back home recently and traveling through Charlotte airport. It was a normal Friday mid-afternoon flight returning to Ronald Reagan International Airport. I had a short layover and moved quickly to my gate.

Once there the incoming plane has just landed and folks were getting off allowing me time to survey my world or turn on the oh so entertaining people watching system. We had the usual array of folks around the gate: recreational travelers, traveling pilots and flight attendants, military folks, families needing some assistance, disabled needing assistance and of course businessmen talking on their phones via Bluetooth (life and death decisions, I am sure) making those around them glance sideways ensuring the businessmen weren’t talking to them.

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Kavanaugh: “I Will Not Be Intimidated”

 

Brett Kavanaugh sent a letter to the Republican and Democrat leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. In it, he calls the allegations against him “smears, pure and simple” and “grotesque and obvious character assassination.”

He also restated his intention to follow through on his nomination. “I will not be intimidated into withdrawing from this process,” Kavanaugh writes. “The coordinated effort to destroy my good name will not drive me out. The vile threats of violence against my family will not drive me out. The last-minute character assassination will not succeed.” Below is the text in full.

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The Most Informed vs. the Least Informed

 

“…I used to think that it was the most informed people in America who were going to save the country. And I’ve started to think maybe it’s the least informed people in America who are going to save the country, because those of us who are the most informed are busy smacking each other across the head on a regular basis.” — Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro had an interesting interview with Glenn Beck, who came across as more likable than I often find him. Perhaps it’s that he’s selling a new book. But a worthwhile conversation.

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Cannonball

 

View original artwork here.

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Is Life a Tale Told by an Idiot? Probably.

 

My favorite political commentator, Dennis Prager, recently argued (Explaining the Left) that the hard political Left in the US and most intellectuals in Europe have abandoned traditional religions. To replace what they’ve abandoned, they’ve adopted a false religion of left wing political activism. Prager’s thesis makes a lot of sense to me.

Unhappily, Prager’s unflattering portrait of the Left’s lack of religious affiliations also describes me. That is, what he says of the Left—they have no God, believe most of the Bible is myth, and that death brings oblivion—is what I believe.

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Order … It’s Not What I Thought

 

Order? Order, you say? It is something I used to strive for in my life. I diligently worked to have everything turn out how I thought it ought to for quite a while. I was a young married woman, with a son, a job, and some plans. Then, we had baby number two. We were delighted to have her. She had a rocky first few months because of colic, and there were a few times when I actually had to just hand her over to Dad, and go outside and walk around a bit because I was exhausted from the crying. But, she overcame that, too, and was a precocious and adorable baby.

When she was about nine months old, I discovered to my shock, that one can get pregnant while nursing a baby. So, our third child was born when our son was three, and his first sister was sixteen months old. A funny thing happened: it was easier to deal with three children than two. I don’t know why. Maybe it was that I’d already figured out how to handle more than one child, or maybe it was because the older two could entertain each other for minutes at a time, allowing me the chance to change a diaper, or get a drink of water. By this time, of course, I was no longer working outside our home. But I was the Queen of the Castle, for sure. (By the way, the total children count is five.)

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Quote of the Day: “The Cat Is on the Mat”

 

Every once in a while, I’ll pick a date for one of these “Quote of the Day” posts because it resonates with me. It’s a special date for me, or it’s the anniversary of something, or the memorial of something, or a famous date in history, or something else I want to write about. But more often than not, I pick a date at random, and then back into a subject, either as one strikes me, or by noodling around on the web until I find something interesting. I like that. I like finding something to write about that I otherwise wouldn’t, and then having to take a stab at it.

So, here we are on September 23. And Wikipedia has bailed me out again: Today is the 218th birthday of one William Holmes McGuffey, probably the most illustrious and best-known citizen of the small hamlet of Claysville, just a few miles down the road from Chez She, out here in the wilds of Western Pennsylvania.

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Poor Unfortunate Soles, Part 2: The Fit

 

I know that in the past my shoes were nasty.
I wasn’t kidding when I said they hurt, well, like a witch.
But you’ll find that nowadays, I’ve mended all my ways,
Repented, seen the light, and made a switch.

It’s time for part two of our series, and this post will address measuring and fitting. Some may find this an odd place to start — surely arch supports are more important, right? Sure, proper support of the underside of the foot is important, but the dirty secret that shoe people are loath to divulge is that putting an orthotic in a $30 shoe that fits correctly will result in a happier customer than a $300 high-end shoe that doesn’t fit. So before we can fit the nooks and crannies of the bottom of one’s feet, we have to address the other five surfaces.

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How to Build a Computer 10001: Binary

 

We’ve just come off a long saunter through the manufacturing process. We’ll go back soon enough I promise you, but I figured that we could stand a changeup. We’ll be visiting the wild and wonderful world of binary today. Despite what you may have been told there will be math.

The 10 Types of People in This World

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